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Gas Turbine Gas Path Fault Diagnosis based on Adaptive Nonlinear Steady-State Thermodynamic Model

Volume 14, Number 4, April 2018, pp. 751-764
DOI: 10.23940/ijpe.18.04.p18.751764

Jingchao Lia, Guoyin Zhanga, and Yulong Yingb

aSchool of Computer Science and Technology, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin, 150001, China.
bSchool of Energy and Mechanical Engineering, Shanghai University of Electric Power, Shanghai, 200090, China

(Submitted on December 20, 2017; Revised on February 2, 2018; Accepted on March 26, 2018)

Abstract:

Gas turbine engines always run during poor working conditions that have high temperatures, high pressures, and high mechanical and thermal stress. Thus, the performance of the gas path components gradually degrades, leading to serious faults. So, the health status of the engine gas path components provides essential information for users and operators. Here, a new gas path analysis approach has been developed to predict gas turbine engine health status by using gas path measurements. The developed approach has been tested in seven test cases where the degradation of a model gas turbine engine similar to a three-shaft marine engine has been analyzed. The case studies have shown that the approach can accurately and quickly detect, isolate, and quantify the degradation of major engine gas path components with the existence of measurement noise. The test cases have also shown that the time cost by the approach is short enough for its potential application of online health monitoring.

 

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